She threw a quince to me…

投我以木瓜、報之以瓊琚。
匪報也、永以為好也。

投我以木桃、報之以瓊瑤。
匪報也、永以為好也。

投我以木李、報之以瓊玖。
匪報也、永以為好也。

She threw a quince to me;
I requited her with a girdle-gem.
No, not just as requital,
But as a pledge of eternal love.

She threw a peach to me;
I requited her with a greenstone.
No, not just as requital,
But as a pledge of eternal love.

She threw a plum to me;
I requited her with an amulet.
No, not just as requital,
But as a pledge of eternal love.

《木瓜 – Quince》 from 《詩經 – The Book of Poetry》. English translation by Arthur Waley.

Commentary of the Poem by John C. H. Wu (吳經熊), Beyond East and West (New York: Sheed and Ward, 1951), Chap. 5, p.44:

What a beautiful sentiment is here embodied! It is “simple in conception, abounding in sensible images, and informing them all with the spirit of the mind.” It fulfills the Chinese ideal of art: the impression should be as unfathomable as the ocean, while the expression should be as clear as crystal. In these few lines, the whole philosophy of love and friendship, which is the purest form of love, is shrined. For love does not count in terms of material gifts. Love is lavish. Love is generous. Love is the infinite, in the presence of which all mathematical and worldly distinctions melt and vanish into the air. Do you call it extravagant to return a greenstone for a peach? No, he says, it is not enough. She gives me a peace, because she loves me. I can only repay love with my love.